Ruby Braff - Hi-Fi Salute To Bunny (MCD-1016)

Mosaic Singles

 

Ruby Braff - Hi-Fi Salute To Bunny (MCD-1016)

"For every number played by Ruby Braff and His Men swings mightily. They could hardly do otherwise with a rhythm section composed of Walter Page, bass; Steve Jordan, guitar; Nat Pierce, piano; and Buzzy Drootin, drums." - Original liner notes
Limited Edition

1 CD -  $15.00

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The Band Swings from First Note to Last

1957 marked the 15th anniversary of the death of the remarkable trumpeter and bandleader Bunny Berigan. To pay homage to Bunny, RCA Victor (Berigan's label for most of his recorded output) decided to bring Ruby Braff and seven mainstream veterans and newcomers to the studio and perform nine tunes associated with Berigan including I Can't Get Started, Marie and Downhearted Blues.. He is joined by Pee Wee Russell, Dick Hafer, Benny Morton, Nat Pierce, Steve Jordan, Walter Page (one of his last recordings) and Buzzy Drootin. The band swings from first note to last and stretches out soulfully on each tune (six of which are over six minutes). Did I Remember?, a bonus track originally issued only on a compilation, completes the sessions.



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CUSTOMER REVIEWS

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  Disappointing then, more disappointing now
Bought this on RCA when it first came out and felt that it was a surprisingly lifeless date, given the eminence of the young Braff and the quality, on paper at least, of the rest of the band. I attributed this lifelessness in part to the rather claustrophobic sound -- there seemed to have been virtually no resonance to the studio where it was recorded, and enough resonance is crucial to capturing Braffs fat sound -- and bought the Mosaic assuming/hoping that careful remastering would bring improvement. If anything, sound quality is worse than on my old LP; still just as airless -- was the album remastered at all? -- and Nat Pierces piano even breaks up on several tracks. Wish I could return this one, dont think Ill ever listen to again.
 
  Good Day
The rhythm section rocks! I'd sound good on a broken kazoo in front of these guys. Braff on a great day, the whole band is inspired.
 
  Great set
This set has early jazz numbers with modern sound. I kick myself for not getting the Bunny Berigan set when it was in print.
 
  The american bass players
I would like to know if Mosaic has the bass players records. Like Milt Hinton. If you have, please send me your catalogue with them all. Ana
 

Ruby Braff - Hi-Fi Salute To Bunny (MCD-1016)
Ruby Braff - Hi-Fi Salute To Bunny (MCD-1016)
Limited Edition: copies
1 CD - $15.00


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Discography

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I Can't Get Started
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